Save The Rhino

Posted by
|

 

 

World Odyssey have signed up to help Save the Rhino with their Big 5 not Big 4 campaign.  This campaign is particularly relevant at this time when poaching is taking its toll on rhinos and other big game.

You can donate to the SRI fund via the following weblink:

World Odyssey’s fundraising platform

Black-Rhino-for-FB

The geographical range of the rhinos plight goes beyond solely Africa, as there are rhinos in Nepal, India and parts of SE Asia.

Save the Rhino International works to protect all five rhino species in Africa and Asia and support the communities that share their habitat.

Below: Rhino Protection Unit in Sumatra -

RhinoProtectionUnitSumatra(C)SRI

Below: Environmental community programme -

EnvironmentalEducationProgrammeTanzania(C)SRI

By funding anti-poaching and monitoring patrols, environmental education, community conservation and demand reduction activities, Save the Rhino InternationaI’s goal is to deliver long-lasting and widespread benefits to rhinos, ecosystems and local communities.

Below: Anti Poaching Ranger in Namibia -

RhinoRangerNamibia(C)SRI

Below: Anti-poaching patrols
Helping rangers to protect rhinos from poachers and collect information to manage the rhino populations. £19 could buy a pair of canvas boots for a ranger.

SONY DSC

Wherever Save the Rhino International works, their aims are to:

- increase numbers of rhinos in genetically viable populations in the wild
- enhance the integrity of ecosystems
- ensure that local communities benefit from conservation activities

rhino & calf

 

 

Information about Save the Rhino International

Save the Rhino International (UK registered charity number 1035072) works to conserve all five species of rhino found in Africa and Asia by funding conservation activities and educational programmes to ensure long-lasting and widespread benefits to rhinos, ecosystems and local communities. To find out more about their work, please visit www.savetherhino.org

SONY DSC

In 2007 only 13 rhinos were killed in South Africa for their horns; in 2014 it was 1,215 rhinos. In 2014, three rhinos were killed each day on average in South Africa alone, and at the current rate of poaching rhinos could be extinct in the wild by 2026.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Poaching for their horns is the biggest threat to the rhino’s survival.

PoachedRhino2(C)LowveldRhinoTrust

Wildlife trafficking (the third largest illegal trade after drugs and arms) destroys wildlife, threatens global security and affects employment of poorer local communities. Save the Rhino International is a small and vibrant charity that works to protect all five rhino species in Africa and Asia and support the communities that share their habitat.

Below: Eastern Black Rhino -

EasternBlackRhino(C)SRI

Why save rhinos?

•Rhinos benefit local people by bringing employment through tourism, conservation jobs and education programmes

•By protecting rhinos you are also conserving the wider ecosystem and other animal and plant species that share their habitat

•Rhinos are an iconic species that are important to conserve for future generations

•Extinction is preventable: humans are responsible for the decline in rhino numbers and it is of global importance to save them. Illegal wildlife trafficking has serious implications for the security and prosperity of people around the world.

GreaterOneHornedRhino3(C)SRI

Why do people poach rhinos?
•The significant rise in poaching is due to increasing demand for rhino horn in Asian countries

•Rhino horn is used as a status symbol by wealthy individuals and also in traditional medicine, but there is no scientific evidence to prove that it works as a medicine

•This illegal trade is being carried out by criminal groups who are killing rhinos on a daily basis for billions of dollars a year, while leaving a trail of devastation behind, impacting not only wildlife and local communities, but also global security
Protecting rhinos
Save the Rhino International supports a number of ongoing rhino conservation programmes across Africa and Asia, funding a range of activities including:
Anti-poaching patrols
Helping rangers to protect rhinos from poachers and collect information to manage the rhino populations. £19 could buy a pair of canvas boots for a ranger.
Environmental education
Engaging a new generation about the importance of preserving their natural environment. £50 could pay the salary of an environmental education officer for a month.
Demand reduction
Running public awareness campaigns in Vietnam to reduce the demand for rhino horn. £100 could pay for a public awareness event.
Community conservation
Developing sustainable methods for local communities to manage their natural resources. £300 could pay for a local community project farming initiatives grant.
Veterinary care
Providing medical care for rhinos including implanting transmitters into horns or removing snares. £1,000 could pay for a vet to treat a black rhino who has been shot by a poacher.

 

Add a comment